Planet X Town Hall

ilinda - SURVIVAL HEALTH => Survival Recipes of the World => Topic started by: noproblemo2 on August 12, 2010, 08:42:17 PM

Title: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 12, 2010, 08:42:17 PM
Anyone have suggestions for survival recipes?
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 12, 2010, 08:43:03 PM
Instant Refried Bean Mix

3 cups of dried beans, any variety (I have used black and pinto)
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon dried minced onion
cayenne pepper, to taste

In a coffee grinder, food mill or blender, grind beans until a flour
consistency. Mix all ingredients together until they are well blended. Store in a large airtight container or jar

TO USE:

3/4 C. Instant Refried Bean Mix 2 1/2 cups boiling water

Combine bean mix and water in a medium-sized saucepan. Mix with a wire
whisk until combined. Don't worry about the lumps, they are tasty and add
texture to your beans. Bring to boil, cover, reduce heat to low and simmer for
4-5 minutes or until thickened. Mixture will thicken more as it cools.
Refried beans will remain thickened even when reheating.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on August 12, 2010, 11:49:42 PM
Noproblemo what a neat recipe! I want to try that...

Also, back in April Carlos posted an interesting recipe of a food called tsampa.
[The Feminine Side of 2012 / Re: As a female, what is your main focus?
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: 1969quartz0 on August 13, 2010, 06:08:31 AM
Yowbarb and Noproblemo thanks I am going to try both.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 13, 2010, 08:51:25 AM
Here is one for Beef Jerky.
Jerky: A Protein Source
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on August 13, 2010, 09:36:01 AM
Noproblemo thank you.
This is a great food to learn to prepare. Talk about your survival recipes! - Yowbarb

An image of buffalo jerky ... Plains Indians,
http://firstpeoplesofcanada.com/images/firstnations/fp_metis/food_pemmican_jerky.jpg (http://firstpeoplesofcanada.com/images/firstnations/fp_metis/food_pemmican_jerky.jpg)

(http://firstpeoplesofcanada.com/images/firstnations/fp_metis/food_pemmican_jerky.jpg)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 13, 2010, 09:40:00 AM
Hmm wonder what other flavors one could use for jerky? Teriyaki maybe?
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on August 25, 2010, 08:52:56 AM
Vegetable Nituke miso soup   Yowbarb's basic recipe:
Ingredients: vegetables, oil, water, miso and tahini. 
This soup could be made with any vegetable.
...

A tablespoon or two of oil in the bottom of the iron pan.
Let it heat up a little while, not burning the oil...
Drop in the carrots, reduce the heat.  Stir and cook them around for about ten minutes
Put in the diced or sliced onions and garlic and stir. Cook about five minutes.

A second pan has water boiling.
Take about three tablespoons miso and an equal amount tahini and mix them in a bowl with a little water at a time. Make a paste.  This is a soup base.
Stir the cooked vegetables and the soup base into the pot of boiling water. A couple of quarts. Not an exat recipe.
It just needs to simmer about fifteen minutes. The thickness and saltiness and amount of vegetables is up to individual taste.
Toward the end of the cooking time a person could add dark greens, pieces of nori seaweed, etc. if they like.

...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 25, 2010, 09:21:24 AM
Solar Meatballs
1 pound ground chuck

1 egg

1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

1 8-oz. can tomato sauce

1/2 cup chopped onion

1/4 teaspoon granulated garlic

salt and pepper to taste

Mix all ingredients (1/4 cup tomato sauce) so mixture sticks together in walnut-sized balls. (If mixture is too sticky, add bread crumbs, oatmeal or crushed crackers.) Place meatballs in 9-inch dark round roaster or an amber glass dish; pour remaining tomato sauce on top. Cover. Bake in solar oven approximately 1 hour.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on August 25, 2010, 09:45:08 AM
Noproblemo2 I forgot about solar cooking!!
Thanks for reminding.
Sounds like a great recipe.
Found a solar cooking link,
Yowbarb

http://solarcooking.org/plans/ (http://solarcooking.org/plans/)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 25, 2010, 09:48:55 AM
Noproblemo2 I forgot about solar cooking!!
Thanks for reminding.
Sounds like a great recipe.
Found a solar cooking link,
Yowbarb

http://solarcooking.org/plans/ (http://solarcooking.org/plans/)
Here's one for a building a solar still
http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Cooking/cooking.htm#SolarStills (http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Cooking/cooking.htm#SolarStills)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on August 25, 2010, 12:03:15 PM
I took out most of my running commentary and blab on the soup and so on, here they are, below. The recipe itself without comment is in a couple of posts above,
Yowbarb
...
Vegetable Nituke miso soup

vegetables, oil, water, miso and tahini.  This is Japanese but it is not complicated. I don't have exact translation but nituke means a sauteed vegetable dish.     (Probably.)
'scuse it if I define terms you already know:
Miso is an ancient Japanese food made of soybeans, or rice etc.
Tahini is sesame butter, more on it , below.*
Here is a simple recipe, it could be a budget stretcher possibly in the aftertimes when there are crops. Or any time there is a lot of produce available... Afterthought: You can use dried vegetables, too, of course.
The main ingredients, carrots onions garlic are not so expensive not so hard to grow...
The miso and tahini are dense, nutrient - rich foods that keep a long time, inexpensive too. They are fermented. The Japanese used to (or do?)  keep the miso in big barrels. I am not sure the limits on how long you could keep fermented miso... If you have a big batch of it and it is refrigerated, I feel it would be good to use a long time.
The Zen Buddhist monks had miso and tahini as staples.

At some point MREs could run out and it may not be possible to go kill animals, so the miso could be a life saver. Whether there is fresh produce or not. It would be worth the effort to look at big batches and see how it needs to be stored, etc. how long can it be used when opened, refrigeration etc. Will be looking into it. Note: Linda has posted lots of info on drying vegetables. This would be a very good idea. The dried veges could be kept as a staple to use in the miso soup.

This soup could be made with just about any vegetable a person has.
A person can do this without a recipe.

This would need to be tweaked if a person is making a big batch to feed a lot of people.
Experiment with the proportions and size of the batch. Also, of course, what people will eat.

Sidenote: I plan on getting a tripod and a few big iron pots. Note: One or two pots I would keep only to boil water. One big iron pot I would use for stuff like miso. (If I were to do a big meat pot I would use stainless steel which a can be scoured and washed and dried and rinsed with boiling water.)

Re vegetarian cooking in iron pots and pans: I found in the past, if I used an iron pan, already well seasoned, and used good oil and non - meat ingredients, I could saute a few veggies including dark greens add cooked rice whatever.  I didn't let it get all stuck with stuff. After cookiing I scraped it off rinsed , wiped, oiled it and just used it again... no none got sick. Everyone needs to decide their own kitchen hygiene. I found if it was iron, well  oiled, cool environment, and non meat cooking I didn't have to worry so much about super sanitizing everything. Not selling vegetarianism it has it's simplicity and advantages sometimes.
[If you are preparing food for babies then it has to be sanitary.]
...
Here is what I have done in small batches:
Nice heavy big iron pan.
I take a good cold - pressed oil like sesame, but just about any oil would do that is available (Do not heat olive oil.)
Chop up a batch of vegetables.
The usual vegetables to use are carrots, onions and garlic.
Note: Greens can be added later when these are done. I used to start with carrots because they are heavier and take longer to cook.

Yowbarb's basic recipe:
A tablespoon or two of oil in the bottom of the iron pan.
Let it heat up a little while, not burning...
Drop in the carrots and stir them around for a few minutes
Put in the diced or sliced onions and garlic and stir...

A second pan has water boiling.
Take a blob (three tablespoons or so) miso and an equal amount tahini and mix them in a bowl with a little water at a time. Make a paste.  This is a soup base.
Stir the cooked vegetables and the soup base into the pot of boiling water. It just needs to simmer about fifteen minutes. The thickness and saltiness and amount of vegetables is up to individual taste.
Toward the end of the cooking time a person could add dark greens, pieces of nori seaweed, etc. if they like. Fresh vegetables are preferred of course, but if you are trying to feed a bunch of hungry people then use what you have. As long as you have a supply of miso and tahini any kind of vegetable and a pot, you can put on a meal. It will provide protein, vitamins minerals, and fiber.

It would probably be OK with canned okra or canned mustard greens. I like that sort of food not everyone would, but this is life giving stuff.  You might have to adjust the recipe to what people will eat. If a person had rice to use up, or canned hominy even, just dump it in. It will help fill up the empty stomachs.

Yowbarb sidenote: When my son was little I couldn't get him to have miso soup. It was one of our staples. All the girls would have miso. On miso nights I had to make him a peanut butter sandwich or whatever else he would eat. [Never made my kids go hungry if all else failed there was raw veges with ranch dressing to dip them in, and a natural peanut butter and jam sandwich.]
When he got a little older he used to go to Japanese place in Los Feliz area and plunk down his cash to buy a bowl. It wasn't expensive. 

*sesame butter used as a common protein staple in the Middle East and the Far East. You can find it in glass jars in the international foods section of large supermarkets.  You can also find small cans of it in the Jewish or middle eastern staples there. Also easy to find in health food stores. If I find a cheap large source of it, will post here.
I read an article decades ago that said the people who use sesame protein regularly usually have tough strong bodies...
- Yowbarb

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on August 25, 2010, 12:28:03 PM
We will call this Barb's Beet Tomato Borscht

A soup I concocted decades ago...
I had never heard of borscht at the time.. but this is sort of a borscht soup.
This is enough for 1-2 people

Ingredients:
1-2 fresh raw beets, with the fibrous parts off, chop them in half inch pieces
3 medium carrots
half a large onion
3 cloves garlic
2 tomatoes
1 quart water

Heat up some cold - pressed sesame or corn in an iron frying pan
Sautee the beets first, for about 5 minutes
add the carrots to the pan and cook for about 5 minutes
add the onions and garlic stir and cook without burning, a few minutes.
Stir the sauteed vegetables into the pot of boiling water.
Bring to a boil then turn down the heat.
Add the chopped tomatoes and simmer the pot for about fifteen minutes.
You can season with sea salt, tamari soy sauce or miso... to taste

You may need to cook it down, not exact.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Mjoy on August 28, 2010, 05:09:46 AM
One of the best "weeds" around is Stinging Nettles!  One can make a tea from it, one can make a soup from it, or eat it raw (yes, you can!  :P)  They are all over the place, where I live (Germany), and I like to collect them, especially in the Spring, when they are young. Here is some information about it and my favorite soup recipe, which is the last of the websites below.  ENJOY!:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle)
http://www.herbsarespecial.com.au/isabells_blog/nettle-many-uses-many-benefits.html (http://www.herbsarespecial.com.au/isabells_blog/nettle-many-uses-many-benefits.html)
harvest stinging nettles and eating nettles raw! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9ZdKdhKfcw#)
http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Nettle.html (http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Nettle.html)
http://www.nettlesoup.info/nettlesoup.htm (http://www.nettlesoup.info/nettlesoup.htm)
Bye for now,
Mary
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on August 28, 2010, 07:31:58 AM
Thanks Mjoy, will add this also
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on September 15, 2010, 11:49:47 AM
One of the best "weeds" around is Stinging Nettles!  One can make a tea from it, one can make a soup from it, or eat it raw (yes, you can!  :P)  They are all over the place, where I live (Germany), and I like to collect them, especially in the Spring, when they are young. Here is some information about it and my favorite soup recipe, which is the last of the websites below.  ENJOY!:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle)
http://www.herbsarespecial.com.au/isabells_blog/nettle-many-uses-many-benefits.html (http://www.herbsarespecial.com.au/isabells_blog/nettle-many-uses-many-benefits.html)
harvest stinging nettles and eating nettles raw! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9ZdKdhKfcw#)
http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Nettle.html (http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Nettle.html)
http://www.nettlesoup.info/nettlesoup.htm (http://www.nettlesoup.info/nettlesoup.htm)
Bye for now,
Mary

Thank you, Mjoy. I have tried dandelions growing wild where I knew there was no pesticide on them... I think nettles are all around here but will have to check.
Am learning more about nettles.  Important they are young and tender... see below. - Yowbarb
(http://online.wsj.com/media/nettle3_E_20090420175103.jpg)

You Grow Girl site,
http://www.yougrowgirl.com/2007/05/03/foraging-stinging-nettles/ (http://www.yougrowgirl.com/2007/05/03/foraging-stinging-nettles/)
Excerpt:
“This year I’m making more of an effort than usual to keep on top of foraging for early spring plants. There are several that are only edible within a short window of time and I don’t want to miss any of them, as is often the case. This year I got started harvesting stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) earlier than ever, since this is one herb that absolutely MUST be harvested in the early spring while the plants are still young and tender, and BEFORE flowers start to appear. I want to stress the importance of that fact since you can damage your kidneys consuming mature nettle parts.”
………………………………………………………………………………………………….
I went out partially prepared with snips and a collecting bag but forgot my gloves and was stuck slowly and delicately lifting each snipped piece into the bag wielding the sharp clippers like tongs. I suffered a few small “bites” to my hand after growing impatient with the delicate procedure but the early season foliage doesn’t seem to be as nasty as late-season plants because I didn’t need to seek out foliar antidotes (Rubbing the leaves of dock, mullein, jewelweed, or plantain on your skin will neutralize the sting. It is said that the cure is always growing within eyesight and in my experience that has proven to be the case everytime.)
I’m thinking of going out again before the plants mature. I’ve become intrigued by the idea of making up a batch of nettle soup after seeing it done by school kids reliving WW2 times on the BBC show Evacuation.
In the spirit of Be Nice to Nettles Week, we tried our hand at a batch of nettle soup using the site recipe as a basis. Let me tell you that a half pound of nettles is a whole lot more than you’d expect. I harvested enough young nettles (stems included) to fill a small plastic bag however once the stems and not so great parts were removed it came out to just slightly over 1/4 pound. Here’s what that looks like:
Just a reminder to protect your hands with gloves at any point in the process that involves touching any part of the fresh nettles including leaves and stems. The plant will lose its sting once cooked, but can get you at anytime when fresh, even when soaking under water.
The recipe seemed a little too bland so I chopped and added half a small onion before adding the nettles. We did not have sour cream or yoghurt on hand so I garnished mine with bits of smoked trout bought at my local farmer’s market. The soup was really good, tasting very much like vichyssoise. In fact I ate the leftovers cold. The geek in me was very satisfied that a portion of this meal was collected/foraged from the out-of-doors. Over the last year I’ve come back full circle to an early interest in wild foods and edible weeds that I haven’t really indulged since I was a teenager foraging for plants with 'Edible Weeds of Canada' tucked under my arm."
……………………………………………………………………………………….
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle#Medicinal_uses (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle#Medicinal_uses)   Stinging Nettle, medicinal uses

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinging_nettle)   Stinging nettle

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on September 28, 2010, 04:48:33 PM
This is From svisioner
his own homemade tortilla recipe, which he posted on the COSTCO as an emergency supplier topic.
- Yowbarb
...
svisioner: We just got done making a batch on the wood stove (cool here today.)

Whole wheat Tortillas
Ingredients:
* 2 cups all purpose or whole wheat flour
* 1/4 cup vegetable shortening, cut into pieces, we use olive oil 1/4 cup per batch
* 1/2 tsp. salt
* 1/2 tsp. baking powder
* 3/4 cup warm water
You can use some garlic power or onion etc in the batch
Directions:
In a bowl, blend flour, salt, baking powder and shortening until it resembles fine meal.

Add warm water, a little at a time, to flour mixture and toss until liquid is incorporated. Water amountwill vary with different flour types.

Form dough into a ball and kneed on a floured surface until dough is smooth and elastic. Divide, and make 12 smaller balls. Cover and let stand at least 30 minutes.

Cooking Tortilla:
Roll each ball of dough on a floured surface to make 6 or 7 inch sized tortillas. Place on a pre-heated griddle or cast iron skillet and cook till medium golden on both sides.

Remove to a basket lined with a cloth towel or put between a towel until cool. After the tortillas have cooled completely, store them in a plastic bag. This recipe will make approximately 12 flour tortillas.

We make a triple batch, on the wood cook stove you can cook 6 at a time. Failing having a wood cook  stove you can make them on a case iron pan one at a time. Problem doing it that was is you'll eat them as them come off of the stove and never save any for later.



Visit WWW.PlaceofRefuge2012.com (http://WWW.PlaceofRefuge2012.com)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on September 28, 2010, 05:13:02 PM
Note on making tortillas, it is VERY important to let the dough rest at least 30 minutes to an hour prior to shaping.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 13, 2010, 11:58:00 AM
Note on making tortillas, it is VERY important to let the dough rest at least 30 minutes to an hour prior to shaping.

BajaSusan, maybe this is why I didn't have much luck with homemade tortillas years ago. I probably tried to rush it and skipped this step! At the time I lived near Grand Central Market in L.A. and they had all kinds of cool supplies including masa flour.
BTW that should be added to the survival list... ;) you probably already put it on.
Things like masa flour and canned butter, dried beans and seasonings... would help fill up a lot of stomachs...

All The Best,

Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on October 13, 2010, 12:28:53 PM
Do you have the link for canned butter?
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 17, 2010, 12:51:50 AM
Do you have the link for canned butter?

I have seen it, have posted a link to a store that had it, will have to look for it. Will have it posted here sometime next little while,
Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 17, 2010, 01:09:21 AM
BajaSusan,well I don't know the very best deal but I just found this: A place where you can buy cases of clarified butter.
MRE Depot  http://www.mredepot.com/servlet/StoreFront (http://www.mredepot.com/servlet/StoreFront)
1 Case of Pure US Canned Ghee / Clarified...$109.95   Twelve 16-oz can

Also,
Red Feather Canned Butter
http://store.prepared.pro/redfeathercannedbutter.aspx (http://store.prepared.pro/redfeathercannedbutter.aspx)

Price: $195.00
Red Feather Real Canned Butter from
http://store.prepared.pro/redfeathercannedbutter.aspx (http://store.prepared.pro/redfeathercannedbutter.aspx)
Ballantyne's in New Zealand

If you have been looking to add REAL butter, not powdered or freeze dried, to your long term food storage program, then look no further!

We have found a canned butter that is imported from New Zealand that actually tastes better than any gourmet butter we had ever tried - and with an indefinite shelf life, no refrigeration is necessary!!

GREAT FOR CAMPING! PERFECT FOR THE BOAT OR RV!

Now you can finally have smooth, creamy, high-quality butter . . . and who cares if the electricity goes off??

And the best part (besides the great taste), is the list of ingredients: Pasteurized Cream and Salt - that's it!! No preservatives, food colorings or chemicals of any kind, just naturally made wholesome butter from down under.

Speaking of ingredients; Here's what the label lists for nutritional info compared to the American butter that we are all used to today;
Serving Size: 1 Tbsp (14g)
Servings per container: 24
Calories: 100
Calories from fat: 100

% Daily Value
Total fat: 11g 17%
Saturated fat: 8g 40%
Cholesterol: 30mg 9%
Sodium: 65mg 3%
Total Carbohydrates: 0g 0%
Protein: 0g 0%
Vitamin A: 8%

Each can contains 12 oz of butter - which works out to three traditional sticks of butter. Each case has 24 cans. THIS PRICE IS FOR ONE CASE 
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on October 17, 2010, 05:42:26 AM
Thanks for the link
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 18, 2010, 01:13:17 PM
Thanks for the link

BTW I have heard the following things about ghee - also known as ghi or clarified butter:
(All verbal info)

Ghi cleans out the liver and helps it to function
Ghi nourishes and protects the skin and helps to attract nourishment from the air
I met a woman who had been terminally ill.  (Apparantly not sick any more.)
She told me she bought ghi and began eating it and slathering it on her skin and getting lots of sun and air. She just kicked the ___ out of the cancer.
She didn't go back to the doctors just bought everything at Organicville and went on what she learned via the health grapevine, instincts... I think she did go vegetarian macrobiotic but added lots more ghi than what would be on the diet and also way more raw fruits, etc.
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on October 18, 2010, 01:40:27 PM
Worth a try, found this recipe.

Recipe
Homemade Ghee

Accompanying article: Ghee (Clarified Butter)

Makes about 2 cups

It is critical to use unsalted butter to make ghee; and for the most flavorful result, use cultured butter. Organic Valley and some—but not all—European-Style butters are both cultured and unsalted. This recipe is easily doubled or tripled but requires increased cooking time.

1 pound cultured, unsalted organic butter

Place the butter in a heavy quart saucepan and melt over medium heat, do not cover the pot. When the butter starts foaming, reduce the heat and simmer uncovered and undisturbed for about 15 to 30 minutes, depending upon the heat and weight of the saucepan. As its water content vaporizes, it will foam and you’ll hear tiny, sharp crackling noises. The ghee is ready when it:

• Changes from a cloudy yellow to clear golden color
• Develops a popcorn-like aroma
• Stops foaming and making crackling noises
• Develops a thin, light tan, crust on the nearly motionless surface
• The milk solids at the bottom turn from white to tan

Keep a close watch on the ghee and remove from the heat when done. (If overcooked, it browns and starts foaming.) Let cool until it is just warm.

Pour through a fine sieve or through several layers of cheesecloth into a clean, dry glass storage jar. Discard he strained out solids. When the ghee is completely cool, cover tightly and store in a dry place away from direct sun light. It doesn't require refrigeration. Always use a clean spoon to dip into it.

Variation:  Oven-made Ghee

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F. Put the butter in a 1½ to 2 quart casserole or oven-proof pot. Place the butter in the oven without a lid and allow it to clarify, undisturbed, for 1 hour. As it boils and foams the water content vaporizes and if you open the oven you'll hear tiny, sharp crackling noises. The ghee is ready as detailed above.

Remove the ghee from the oven. Skim off the crust and, if desired, use it as a flavoring agent.

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 18, 2010, 03:09:11 PM
 8)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 23, 2010, 05:35:32 PM
My Grandma Vina used to make "Garbage Soup." out of any leftovers whatsoever in the refrigerator, I think that 's what it was once a week or once every 2 weeks.
As long as it was not actually rotton, it went into a big pot.
(We didn't do the thing where you scrape someone's plate into the soup pot.)

All I can say is every single thing went into the garbage soup.
Back in those days we actually had to empty the fridge once in awhile and defrost it wash it down. Some of the things which would go into garbage soup: A bowl of leftover cooked vegetables. A small container of chopped onions or peppers, frozen. Some extra cooked hamburger meat. A frozen dab of soup or gravy.  I'm thinking maybe some tortillas or stale bread or spaghetti went in, good when cooked down. Not real sure what it was, but different every time, and always good.

I haven't really got into the habit, but I heard that in France they always keep a big pot simmering and they put in leftovers and cook it down to a wonderful soup. Now that the weather is cooling down I might do some soup pots.

I just now googled "Garbage Soup," because I wasn't sure if anyone else made that, and voila!
Here is one page. Serious Eats
...

http://www.seriouseats.com/talk/2008/08/garbage-soup.html (http://www.seriouseats.com/talk/2008/08/garbage-soup.html)  Garbage Soup
Garbage Soup...
Posted by robincat, August 18, 2008 at 9:56 AM

"...and/or other creative, one of a kind, clean-out-the-fridge creations? Have some of your proudest culinary moments come from using up frozen leftovers, like broths from roasted beef or chicken and vegetables that “need to go today?” For me, soup from what I have on hand with a few pantry items added (beans, pasta, etc.) is intuitive cooking at its best and nearly always yields happy results. Unfortunately, the results are those which can never exactly be repeated…."

Yowbarb Note: Some comments there on the page. with recipe ideas, all is approximate, of course.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Linda on October 26, 2010, 03:57:25 PM
Just made a pot of soup today and a great batch of corn bread in the cast iron skillet! Yum

Linda
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on October 26, 2010, 10:22:43 PM
Just made a pot of soup today and a great batch of corn bread in the cast iron skillet! Yum

Linda

Linda, that does sound wonderful!
Now that the weather is a little cooler, I have been craving soups but so far they are just canned. Now that I am caught up again around here I may be more inspired to make soup. I have a lotta different vegetables...
- Yowbarb
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Linda on October 27, 2010, 05:37:54 AM
I just so happen to have seen a recipe on tv yesterday morning and I had all the ingredients to make it. Wow how often does that happen that you don't have to run to the market to get everything. It turned out great, had butternut squash in it, so it was very fall like. :)

Linda
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on November 09, 2010, 09:18:26 PM
I just so happen to have seen a recipe on tv yesterday morning and I had all the ingredients to make it. Wow how often does that happen that you don't have to run to the market to get everything. It turned out great, had butternut squash in it, so it was very fall like. :)

Linda

Linda, that sounds good I would really (finally) like to get into the squash and pumpkin soups. These have been staples in Asia for centuries.... I think the English and the early Americans used these things too. Cheap, apparently easy to grow. Also these foods have healing qualities. Not sure what it is yet...Yowbarb
posting a bit about pumpkins and recipes below,

I  have never made this one but it looks fairly easy:

Japanese Soup Recipes
Ingredients:
•1 lb kabocha pumpkin, seeds removed
•1/2 onion, thinly sliced
•1 Tbsp butter
•2 tsp chicken bouillon powder
•2 cups water
•1 2/3 cup milk
•salt and pepper to season
Preparation:
Place kabocha in a plate and heat in microwave for a minute. Cut kabocha into small pieces. Saute onion slices with butter in a medium pan until softened. Add kabocha and saute together. Pour water and add chicken bouillon powder in the pan. Simmer on low heat for about 20 minutes, or until kabocha is softened. Blend the mixture in blender and put it back in the pan. Add milk and bring to a boil, stirring the soup. Stop the heat and season with salt and pepper.
*Makes 4 servings

http://japanesefood.about.com/od/soup/r/kabochasoup.htm

 
(http://blog.hada.org/jeanette/KabochaUncooked.JPG)


"I first had pumpkin soup when I was in London...." from a New Zealand site
http://www.mobydickens.co.nz/images/images_product/0552556734.jpg

(http://www.mobydickens.co.nz/images/images_product/0552556734.jpg)

...
Wednesday, November 10, 2010

New York 'Times
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/p/pumpkins/recipes/index.html
"....By early American accounts, pumpkins (often called pompions in Colonial cookbooks) and corn kept the early European settlers in North America alive over the long hard New England winters. The settlers, taught by American Indians how to cultivate this New World crop, baked the wholesome, thick-skinned pumpkins in the ashes, stewed them, made puddings and pies of the meat and even pickled the rind.

The pumpkin was probably cultivated in prehistoric times by Indians of both North and South America. Not only was it a staple of their diet, but they also used the shells as cooking pots and serving bowls.

Christopher Columbus on his first voyage wrote that in the eastern end of Cuba, he found vast fields planted with calebazzas (pumpkins and squashes). Another Spanish explorer, Cabeza de Vaca, observed pumpkins growing near Tampa Bay in Florida in 1528, and Hernando De Soto called the pumpkins of western Florida ''better and more flavorful than those of Spain,'' though he was probably confusing our pumpkins with gourds (a different species) grown in Europe.

In 1883, in ''Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book,'' there is not a single pumpkin recipe. Under a recipe for squash pie is the note, like an afterthought, ''Pumpkin pies are made in the same way.'' But the pumpkin has long had a much bigger role and greater versatility in other parts of the Americas." [article continues to use of pumpkins in Latin America]
...

http://www.astray.com/recipes/?show=Pumpkin%20soup%20(american)pumpkin soup (American). Categories
None
Yield
1 Servings
Measure Ingredient
3 tablespoons Butter
1 large Finely chopped onion
1 medium Carrot, finely chopped
1 can Chicken broth
1 cup Water
1 can (1 lb) pumpkin
1 teaspoon Salt
¼ teaspoon Each pepper, cinnamon, ginger
⅛ teaspoon Nutmeg
  Light cream or half and half
Melt 3 T butter and saute 1 large finely chopped onion, 1 medium carrot - finely chopped, till golden, about 8 minutes. Add 1 can chicken broth and 1 cup water. Bring to a boil and simmer, covered, 15 minutes. You can use two cups vegetable broth. Puree in blender and and return to pot. Add 1 lb. can of pumpkin, 1 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp each pepper, cinnamon, ginger and 1/8 tsp nutmeg. Heat while wisking until smooth. Simmer 10 minutes. Slowly stir in light cream or half and half and reheat but do not boil. (The recipe doesn't say how much cream, just use your own judgement).
Posted to EAT-L Digest 02 Apr 97 by Jean Jones <bruja@...> on Apr 3, 1997
...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on November 09, 2010, 09:26:18 PM
Yummy, it's almost pumpkin pie time too !!!!!!
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on November 09, 2010, 09:27:11 PM
http://i.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01510/p_pumpkin-soup_1510934c.jpg

Wed Nov 10 2010, The Telegraph, UK
Recipes

Pumpkin soup recipe
"Pumpkins and squash make a beautifully creamy, light-textured soup."
Pumpkin soup Photo: JOHN LAWRENCEBy Xanthe Clay 6:50AM GMT 28 Oct 2009
Comments
Serves 6

If you’re serving this for a dinner party, tart it up with sage leaves, fried in hot oil until they turn a deep bright green edged with brown. Drain them on kitchen paper (they’ll crisp up) and scatter them over the soup.

1 football-sized pumpkin

2oz/55g butter

1 large onion, sliced

2 sticks of celery, sliced

1 clove of garlic, chopped

1 pint/600ml chicken or vegetable stock


Cut a lid from the top of the pumpkin. Pull out the seeds (keep them for roasting), then with a sturdy metal spoon, scrape out the flesh from the inside, until you are left with a thin shell.
Melt the butter in a large pan and add the onion and celery. Cook gently for 10 minutes or until soft and melting.
Add the garlic and cook for a minute more, then stir in the pumpkin flesh. Cover and cook for 10 minutes, then remove the lid and simmer until all the liquid has cooked away, leaving vegetables sizzling in the butter.
Pour in the stock and liquidise in a blender or using a hand blender. Add enough extra water to make a pouring cream consistency and bring to simmering point.
Taste and season with salt and pepper. Pour into the pumpkin shell and serve with a trickle of single cream and the fried sage leaves.

 


(http://i.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01510/p_pumpkin-soup_1510934c.jpg)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on November 09, 2010, 09:29:49 PM
Yummy, it's almost pumpkin pie time too !!!!!!

I know they look so good! I hate to think of all the wasted pumpkins over the years... time to cook one, I say!  ;) I did do the type where you serve it in the pumpkin shell really good, a couple times.
And the pies OMG my favorite thing...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Jimfarmer on November 22, 2010, 02:59:20 PM
After recipes and videos for fry bread and bannok (all in other topics -- tsk tsk), the next item up the ladder might be sourdough bread.  My dad used to make it in the camp stoves at the sheep camps, and even mom made it sometimes at the ranch.  But I don't know how (tsk tsk).  Can anyone find a reference?
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on November 22, 2010, 03:21:00 PM


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHrLZv8Waoo&playnext=1&list=PL91349B834310D4F2&index=54
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FI4m_xpQpI8&playnext=1&list=PL91349B834310D4F2&index=25
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=POnxAoHl1qc&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-wjBgbKf9I
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Jimfarmer on November 24, 2010, 07:55:28 AM
Thanks for the links to Sourdough videos, BajaSusan,  Beautiful!
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on November 24, 2010, 08:27:16 AM
Hope they help, Sourdough is my favorite bread of all.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on November 30, 2010, 10:09:23 AM
http://www.thecampfireonline.com/Bannock.jpg   Image

(http://www.thecampfireonline.com/Bannock.jpg)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on November 30, 2010, 10:36:59 AM
My mouth is drooling !!!!!!   :P :P :P
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on November 30, 2010, 10:54:54 AM
My mouth is drooling !!!!!!   :P :P :P

I know, doesn't it look super good? 
Been years since I cooked out in the wilderness with a little fire or stove...
 :)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on November 30, 2010, 11:27:21 AM
Think I'll try some stove top style for tonight with Blackberry Jam !!!!!
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on January 04, 2011, 03:24:35 AM
Survival recipe: Grandma Dorothy's Russian Tea Cakes
These surely have enough calories so you could hibernate for awhile.  8)
I just cranked out a huge batch for some New Years presies. - Yowbarb  8)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: augonit on January 04, 2011, 05:11:47 PM
I learned that the Turks believe you should eat three dried apricots a day "for medicine".  I think that's a good way to think of food, like medicine.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on January 04, 2011, 10:33:45 PM
I learned that the Turks believe you should eat three dried apricots a day "for medicine".  I think that's a good way to think of food, like medicine.

Augonit, I agree that is a good way to think of food. The Eastern cultures such as in India and Japan think of food as medicine...
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on February 02, 2011, 10:40:43 AM
All kinds of great tips on foods and food preps from a site in the UK:
http://www.ehow.co.uk/can-vegetables/
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on February 03, 2011, 04:26:09 PM
Thanks Barb good info there
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on June 05, 2011, 06:54:55 AM
Excellent information. I feel prompted to point out that leftovers can be canned instead of freezing - that end times preparation never ends.
Very true, full steam ahead !!! no pun intended.....  ;D
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on June 15, 2011, 03:04:09 PM
Some cheap, filling - type foods for a group, utilizing canned beans of various sorts.
farther below that a recipe from Lori using spam. (If you don't like spam you needn't comment. We had enough of that in the other Topic on what canned foods to purchase.)  ;D
- Yowbarb
...
A basic three bean salad recipe.  (Multiply this about a dozen times, for a group.) I don't have a good bulk recipe yet.  You can change this up to suit tastes. - YB)
...............
http://100delicious.blogspot.com/
Saturday, July 31, 2010

Three Bean Salad

"My mom has been making this for family picnics ever since I can remember. It's best when left to marinate overnight." - Martha

Three Bean Salad

1 can yellow wax beans
1 can cut green beans
1 can dark red kidney beans
1/2 c. chopped celery
1 T. chopped onion
1/4 c. shredded carrot

Drain beans and place all ingredients into bowl.
Mix the following ingredients together together.

1/2 c. salad oil
1/2 c. vinegar
1/2 c. sugar
1 t. salt
1/4 t. celery seed

Pour over beans. Chill overnight. Stir occasionally.
Posted by Martha

.........................................................................................

Re: What canned goods to purchase?

« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2011, 05:15:44 PM »

Sound good recipe with spam.

       Title: FRENCH FRY SPAM CASSEROLE
  Categories: Main dish
       Yield: 8 servings
 
       1 pk Frozen french fry potatoes,
            -thawed (20 oz)
       2 c  Shredded Cheddar cheese
       2 c  Sour cream
       1 can Condensed cream of chicken
            -soup (10 3/4 oz)
       1 can SPAM Luncheon Meat, cubed
            -(12 oz)
     1/2 c  Chopped red bell pepper
     1/2 c  Chopped green onion
     1/2 c  Finely crushed corn flakes
 
   Heat oven to 350'F. In large bowl, combine potatoes, cheese, sour
   cream, and soup. Stir in SPAM, bell pepper, and green onion. Spoon
   into 13x9″ baking dish. Sprinkle with crushed flakes. Bake 30-40
   minutes or until thoroughly heated.
 
...

Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: noproblemo2 on June 15, 2011, 03:11:56 PM
Green beans are a great way to feel full also.
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on June 15, 2011, 03:50:58 PM
Green beans are a great way to feel full also.


I agree.
Hadn't eaten them much until recently.
A housemate got a bunch of them at COSTCO (part of our shared food budget) so when I made stew, I tried adding them toward the end of cooking time -delicious! Also really good in salads. Sort of a protein-y, filling consistency.
 :)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on June 16, 2011, 11:04:58 AM
Here is a bulk three bean salad. Looks good. Made entirely of canned, jarred long lasting stored ingredients.
Parve, definition after recipe. - YB
...
Easy Three Bean Salad (Parve)

By Giora Shimoni, About.com Guide

"This Three Bean Salad is the perfect parve picnic salad. It is quick and easy to prepare. It travels well. And it is so tasty that even the kids will ask for more."

Ingredients:
•2 cans green beans
•2 cans yellow beans (wax beans)
•1 can garbanzo beans (chickpeas)
•1 can black olives (without pits)
•1/4 cup canola oil
•1/4 cup vinegar
•1/4 cup sugar

Preparation:

1. Drains the cans of beans and olives. In a salad bowl, toss them together.
2. In a separate small bowl, mix oil, vinegar and sugar.
3. Pour dressing over the vegetables and toss gently.
4. Serve cold.

http://kosherfood.about.com/od/koshersaladrecipes/r/3bean.htm
...
This salad is Parve. - Yowbarb

Definition: Parve is a Hebrew term (pareve is the Yiddish term) that describes food without any meat or dairy ingredients.

Jewish dietary laws considers pareve food to be neutral; Pareve food can be eaten with both meat and milk dishes.

 Fish, eggs, fruits and vegetables are parve.

More Kosher Vocabulary Words: Glossary of Kosher Terms

Pronunciation: PAHR-vuh
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: errrv on June 19, 2011, 08:44:44 AM
Cowboy trail beans:
 
Pot of water
1/2 cup beans per bowl
Salt to taste
Slab of salt pork or bacon bits to taste

My family has been making this since about 1800. Just put everything in a big bean pot. Fill it 1/2 full of water and then add beans to 1/2 the depth of the water. If you use salt pork; you don't need salt. Cook at a boil for 4 hours, checking to make sure water level does not get too low. It is done when beans are tender. Best served with cornbread.

Mmmmmmm!!!!! Cheap & tasty!!!!
Erv
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: errrv on June 19, 2011, 10:35:38 AM
You don't need to soak them. No difference whatsoever.

Also, if you want to spice up your food cheap, go to an Indian grocery store ( not American Indian) and spices are about $2 a 14oz bag. Just throw it in some tupperwRe & you are set. The Indian stores have just about everything & you only use about half the normal amount because they are so flavorful!

Bon appetite
Erv
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Jimfarmer on June 19, 2011, 01:49:41 PM
errrv:

"Cowboy trail beans:
Pot of water
1/2 cup beans per bowl
Salt to taste
Slab of salt pork or bacon bits to taste"

You forgot:  a few leaves of sagebrush.  (My Dad's version)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: errrv on June 19, 2011, 06:50:12 PM
Depends on if you are out in the southwest or not. If you are in Oklahoma/Texas/Kansas/Missouri, wild onions & garlic!

Yes sir, beans and salt are just the base... Anything you can add will only improve the mixture. I tinker with all kinds of different ways to fix them, they are a big time staple in our household.

I bought the taco beef TVP & bacon bits to add to my stored beans in case TSHF. Can also make the beans and then add rice for a filler. Depends on how many you are feeding. I'm probably going to start stockpiling wheat & rice soon; for Samaritan stock. I can't see not helping folks during this thing if I have the means now to do something about it.

Semper Fi,
Erv
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on July 23, 2011, 02:41:54 AM
Videos on how to make kimchi etc. (I love kimchi.) There is a Part I and Part II.
- Yowbarb
...

Nuclear Fallout Approaching?! Make Kimchi, Save Daikon Seeds, and Blanch Napa Cabbage Part 1  11:07

Uploaded by anetprophet on Mar 20, 2011

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/i39uUkatLT4

How to make Kimchi, save your Daikon seeds in the garden, and finally, blanch your Napa Cabbage in the garden.

Ingredients for the Kimchi:
3 medium heads of Napa Cabbage
3-4 cups of Daikon - Cut into matchsticks or grated
2-3 cups of Carrot - Cut into matchsticks or grated
4-5 Garlic cloves - peeled and chopped
3-4 tsp chopped Ginger
1/3 cup Paprika
dried chili pepper to taste
1 small Beet and Beet greens

For the Brine:
1/2 cup of Kosher or Pickling Salt per 2 quarts of water

Thank you for watching. Please subscribe to our channel and rate this video.
-Deeply Rooted Organics

Visit us at:
www.deeplyrootedorganics.com

www.soilcube.com
........

Nuclear Fallout Approaching?! Make Kimchi, Save Daikon Seeds, and Blanch Napa Cabbage Part 2   9:44

Uploaded by anetprophet on Mar 20, 2011

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/ndxUQW9ySOE

How to make Kimchi, save your Daikon seeds in the garden, and finally, blanch your Napa Cabbage in the garden.

[Recipe and ingredients]
Visit us at:
www.deeplyrootedorganics.com
www.soilcube.com
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Jimfarmer on March 12, 2012, 07:33:19 AM
" 20 Uses for Leftover Fruit and Vegetable Rinds and Peels "  at:

http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/20-uses-leftover-fruit-vegetable-rinds-and-peels.html (http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/20-uses-leftover-fruit-vegetable-rinds-and-peels.html)
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: steedy on March 12, 2012, 07:59:31 AM
Last night I watched part of a show about You Don't Know Dixie, and they had some guy on there making moonshine.  I thought about it later and realized that that would be a good thing to have on hand.  With the very high alcohol content, it would be good as an antiseptic cleanser, or overall house cleaner too!  Plus, if you aged it in charred barrels, you get whiskey.  Anyway, I thought having your own still may be a practical thing.  But, how do you make it?
Title: Re: Survival Recipes
Post by: Yowbarb on March 04, 2017, 03:31:52 PM

....Yes, it's true about the pollution of the waters, as well as aquatic life, but in an emergency, people tend to eat to survive, even if they think there might be mercury in the fish, etc.

In fact, just this morning I was reading in Mike Adam's book, Food Forensics that 90% of the mercury contamination in food is carried out of the body, if strawberries are eaten in the same time period, as strawberries are an excellent heavy metal chelator, especially if the toxic metal is in the digestive tract.  So now I suppose we'd better be drying strawberries as well!

ilinda, wow that is great info to know about the strawberries!