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Author Topic: Survival Recipes  (Read 63966 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #30 on: November 09, 2010, 09:18:26 PM »
I just so happen to have seen a recipe on tv yesterday morning and I had all the ingredients to make it. Wow how often does that happen that you don't have to run to the market to get everything. It turned out great, had butternut squash in it, so it was very fall like. :)

Linda

Linda, that sounds good I would really (finally) like to get into the squash and pumpkin soups. These have been staples in Asia for centuries.... I think the English and the early Americans used these things too. Cheap, apparently easy to grow. Also these foods have healing qualities. Not sure what it is yet...Yowbarb
posting a bit about pumpkins and recipes below,

I  have never made this one but it looks fairly easy:

Japanese Soup Recipes
Ingredients:
•1 lb kabocha pumpkin, seeds removed
•1/2 onion, thinly sliced
•1 Tbsp butter
•2 tsp chicken bouillon powder
•2 cups water
•1 2/3 cup milk
•salt and pepper to season
Preparation:
Place kabocha in a plate and heat in microwave for a minute. Cut kabocha into small pieces. Saute onion slices with butter in a medium pan until softened. Add kabocha and saute together. Pour water and add chicken bouillon powder in the pan. Simmer on low heat for about 20 minutes, or until kabocha is softened. Blend the mixture in blender and put it back in the pan. Add milk and bring to a boil, stirring the soup. Stop the heat and season with salt and pepper.
*Makes 4 servings

http://japanesefood.about.com/od/soup/r/kabochasoup.htm

 



"I first had pumpkin soup when I was in London...." from a New Zealand site
http://www.mobydickens.co.nz/images/images_product/0552556734.jpg



...
Wednesday, November 10, 2010

New York 'Times
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/p/pumpkins/recipes/index.html
"....By early American accounts, pumpkins (often called pompions in Colonial cookbooks) and corn kept the early European settlers in North America alive over the long hard New England winters. The settlers, taught by American Indians how to cultivate this New World crop, baked the wholesome, thick-skinned pumpkins in the ashes, stewed them, made puddings and pies of the meat and even pickled the rind.

The pumpkin was probably cultivated in prehistoric times by Indians of both North and South America. Not only was it a staple of their diet, but they also used the shells as cooking pots and serving bowls.

Christopher Columbus on his first voyage wrote that in the eastern end of Cuba, he found vast fields planted with calebazzas (pumpkins and squashes). Another Spanish explorer, Cabeza de Vaca, observed pumpkins growing near Tampa Bay in Florida in 1528, and Hernando De Soto called the pumpkins of western Florida ''better and more flavorful than those of Spain,'' though he was probably confusing our pumpkins with gourds (a different species) grown in Europe.

In 1883, in ''Mrs. Lincoln's Boston Cook Book,'' there is not a single pumpkin recipe. Under a recipe for squash pie is the note, like an afterthought, ''Pumpkin pies are made in the same way.'' But the pumpkin has long had a much bigger role and greater versatility in other parts of the Americas." [article continues to use of pumpkins in Latin America]
...

http://www.astray.com/recipes/?show=Pumpkin%20soup%20(american)pumpkin soup (American). Categories
None
Yield
1 Servings
Measure Ingredient
3 tablespoons Butter
1 large Finely chopped onion
1 medium Carrot, finely chopped
1 can Chicken broth
1 cup Water
1 can (1 lb) pumpkin
1 teaspoon Salt
¼ teaspoon Each pepper, cinnamon, ginger
⅛ teaspoon Nutmeg
  Light cream or half and half
Melt 3 T butter and saute 1 large finely chopped onion, 1 medium carrot - finely chopped, till golden, about 8 minutes. Add 1 can chicken broth and 1 cup water. Bring to a boil and simmer, covered, 15 minutes. You can use two cups vegetable broth. Puree in blender and and return to pot. Add 1 lb. can of pumpkin, 1 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp each pepper, cinnamon, ginger and 1/8 tsp nutmeg. Heat while wisking until smooth. Simmer 10 minutes. Slowly stir in light cream or half and half and reheat but do not boil. (The recipe doesn't say how much cream, just use your own judgement).
Posted to EAT-L Digest 02 Apr 97 by Jean Jones <bruja@...> on Apr 3, 1997
...

noproblemo2

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Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #31 on: November 09, 2010, 09:26:18 PM »
Yummy, it's almost pumpkin pie time too !!!!!!

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #32 on: November 09, 2010, 09:27:11 PM »
http://i.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01510/p_pumpkin-soup_1510934c.jpg

Wed Nov 10 2010, The Telegraph, UK
Recipes

Pumpkin soup recipe
"Pumpkins and squash make a beautifully creamy, light-textured soup."
Pumpkin soup Photo: JOHN LAWRENCEBy Xanthe Clay 6:50AM GMT 28 Oct 2009
Comments
Serves 6

If you’re serving this for a dinner party, tart it up with sage leaves, fried in hot oil until they turn a deep bright green edged with brown. Drain them on kitchen paper (they’ll crisp up) and scatter them over the soup.

1 football-sized pumpkin

2oz/55g butter

1 large onion, sliced

2 sticks of celery, sliced

1 clove of garlic, chopped

1 pint/600ml chicken or vegetable stock


Cut a lid from the top of the pumpkin. Pull out the seeds (keep them for roasting), then with a sturdy metal spoon, scrape out the flesh from the inside, until you are left with a thin shell.
Melt the butter in a large pan and add the onion and celery. Cook gently for 10 minutes or until soft and melting.
Add the garlic and cook for a minute more, then stir in the pumpkin flesh. Cover and cook for 10 minutes, then remove the lid and simmer until all the liquid has cooked away, leaving vegetables sizzling in the butter.
Pour in the stock and liquidise in a blender or using a hand blender. Add enough extra water to make a pouring cream consistency and bring to simmering point.
Taste and season with salt and pepper. Pour into the pumpkin shell and serve with a trickle of single cream and the fried sage leaves.

 



Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #33 on: November 09, 2010, 09:29:49 PM »
Yummy, it's almost pumpkin pie time too !!!!!!

I know they look so good! I hate to think of all the wasted pumpkins over the years... time to cook one, I say!  ;) I did do the type where you serve it in the pumpkin shell really good, a couple times.
And the pies OMG my favorite thing...

Jimfarmer

  • Guest
Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #34 on: November 22, 2010, 02:59:20 PM »
After recipes and videos for fry bread and bannok (all in other topics -- tsk tsk), the next item up the ladder might be sourdough bread.  My dad used to make it in the camp stoves at the sheep camps, and even mom made it sometimes at the ranch.  But I don't know how (tsk tsk).  Can anyone find a reference?


Jimfarmer

  • Guest
Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #36 on: November 24, 2010, 07:55:28 AM »
Thanks for the links to Sourdough videos, BajaSusan,  Beautiful!

noproblemo2

  • Guest
Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #37 on: November 24, 2010, 08:27:16 AM »
Hope they help, Sourdough is my favorite bread of all.

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #38 on: November 30, 2010, 10:09:23 AM »

noproblemo2

  • Guest
Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #39 on: November 30, 2010, 10:36:59 AM »
My mouth is drooling !!!!!!   :P :P :P

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #40 on: November 30, 2010, 10:54:54 AM »
My mouth is drooling !!!!!!   :P :P :P

I know, doesn't it look super good? 
Been years since I cooked out in the wilderness with a little fire or stove...
 :)

noproblemo2

  • Guest
Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #41 on: November 30, 2010, 11:27:21 AM »
Think I'll try some stove top style for tonight with Blackberry Jam !!!!!

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #42 on: January 04, 2011, 03:24:35 AM »
Survival recipe: Grandma Dorothy's Russian Tea Cakes
These surely have enough calories so you could hibernate for awhile.  8)
I just cranked out a huge batch for some New Years presies. - Yowbarb  8)

augonit

  • Guest
Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #43 on: January 04, 2011, 05:11:47 PM »
I learned that the Turks believe you should eat three dried apricots a day "for medicine".  I think that's a good way to think of food, like medicine.

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Survival Recipes
« Reply #44 on: January 04, 2011, 10:33:45 PM »
I learned that the Turks believe you should eat three dried apricots a day "for medicine".  I think that's a good way to think of food, like medicine.

Augonit, I agree that is a good way to think of food. The Eastern cultures such as in India and Japan think of food as medicine...

 

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