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Author Topic: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak  (Read 10602 times)

Yowbarb

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Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« on: March 17, 2011, 05:49:57 AM »
ABC News right now:
The attempt to cool off the reactors has failed. Repeat FAILED.
Radiation threat: Radiation may reach the west coast of the US as early as tomorrow morning.

Earlier this AM ABC News reported one in five of the radiation workers will develop cancer, even
though they are wearing the special suits. That's within the 100 feet radius of the leaking reactors.

- Yowbarb

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2011, 06:41:57 AM »
Update: a meteorolgist on ABC New just said it won't be much radiation reaching the US.
He said that even with Chernobyl the amount of radiation that reached the US was less than what you would get in a chest X Ray. Not sure how bad it will be. I certainly recommend people take the potassium iodide and stay tned to reports.
- Barb

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2011, 10:49:31 AM »
Haven't looked at too many media sources today..
seems like ABC is really playing it down at this point.

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2011, 10:52:35 AM »
Will look through the BBC site here is one story:
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/     BBC News 

17 March 2011 Last updated at 13:04 ET
US to help citizens leave Japan The US government charters planes to evacuate Americans from Japan, in a sign that the US is increasingly concerned about the nuclear crisis.

The US government has chartered planes to evacuate Americans from Japan, in a sign that the US is increasingly concerned about the nuclear crisis.

The US state department issued a travel warning late on Wednesday urging Americans to delay travel to Japan.

America is conducting "minute-by-minute" analysis of the situation, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said on Thursday.

President Barack Obama has assured Japan of America's ongoing support.

In a telephone call on Wednesday night, Mr Obama informed Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan of US evacuation plans.
,,,,,

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2011, 07:11:14 AM »
Dr. Sanjay Gupta on CNN is still saying the amount of radiation is not enough to cause harm...
Not at this point.  - YB
...

http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/world/2011/03/16/jk.gupta.radiation.levels.cnn?iref=allsearch

VIDEO: "My radiation levels quadrupled"

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2011, 07:25:10 AM »
Agency: Japanese nuclear crisis on par with 3 Mile Island    2:28

ausbukarest

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=28KeuT9roHA

Tokyo (CNN) -- Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency raised the level for the crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant Friday from a 4 to 5 -- putting it on par with the 1979 incident at Pennsylvania's Three Mile Island.

According to the International Nuclear Events Scale, a level 5 equates to the likelihood of a release of radioactive material, several deaths from radiation and severe damage to a reactor core.
 
The Chernobyl nuclear accident in the former Soviet Union, for example, rated a 7 on the scale, while Japan's other nuclear crisis -- a 1999 accident at Tokaimura in which workers died after being exposed to radiation -- was a 4. The partial meltdown of a reactor core at Three Mile Island was deemed the worst nuclear accident in U.S. history.
 
Despite the more serious assessment, no expansion of the 12.4-mile (20 kilometer) evacuation zone was necessary, Hidehiko Nishiyama, deputy head of the nuclear agency, said at a briefing Friday.

Explainer: Producing nuclear energy
Earlier evacuation orders took the possibility of greater damage to the plant into account, he said.
 
The agency raised the level not because of any new damage or increasing threat but because engineers now have images showing fuel rod damage and other problems inside the reactor buildings, he said.
 
Still, the situation at the plant remains "very grave," Prime Minister Naoto Kan said Friday.
 
"In order to overcome this crisis, the police, the fire department, self defense forces are all working together putting their lives on the line in an attempt to resolve the situation," he said.
 
The decision to upgrade the assessment came as Japanese authorities came under fire Friday from within and abroad over the lack of timely information on the unfolding nuclear situation as they have battled since March 11 to contain the crisis.
 
People near the plant are increasingly frustrated, not just with the prolonged fight to curb radioactive emissions, but also the lack of immediate information from authorities, an official with a city government near the plant said.
 
"Evacuees, and that can be said of myself as well, are feeling anxious since we are not getting the needed information from the government in a timely manner," said Seiji Sato, a spokesman for the government of Tamura City, about 20 kilometers from the nuclear facility.
 
The head of the U.N. atomic watchdog agency, Yukiya Amano, pressed the Japanese prime minister to open up lines of communication about the crisis during a meeting in Tokyo.
 
Kan vowed to do as much, according to Japan's Kyodo News, saying he'd push to make more information available to the international community and release more detailed data about the nuclear situation.

"The Japanese government and IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) should work doubly hard to pacify the great angst among the international community over this issue," Amano told reporters.

 
The comments came as the effort to prevent further crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi plant entered its second week Friday.
 
Soldiers and utility workers in seven fire engines sprayed the plant's No. 3 reactor with 50 tons of water on Friday in an effort to replenish water in pools containing used fuel rods that officials fear have caught fire and released radiation into the air, Kyodo News reported.
 
Friday afternoon's mission was the fourth, by air and ground, in two days to spray water on damaged areas of the plant.
 
It has not been determined how effective the efforts have been, said Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano.
 
But, Edano added, "We observed vapor after the water was (shot in), so we believe that water did reach the pool, for sure."
 
On Thursday, one of the IAEA's top aides Graham Andrew said there appeared to be "no significant worsening" at the plant, located about 240 kilometers (150 miles) north of Tokyo.
 
Still, no one is close to claiming victory. The nuclear plant's six reactors are in various states of disrepair and concerns are mounting over a potentially larger release of radioactive material.
 
Significant amounts of radiation were released after the 9.0-magnitude earthquake hit on March 11, followed by a tsunami that knocked out the plant's backup power generators and swept away cars and houses along its path.

Relatively high, but officially non-hazardous amounts of radiation have been detected in the air and water of Fukushima city, about 80 kilometers (50 miles) from the plant.
 
Wind patterns pushing radiation from the plant out to sea appear to be minimal for now.
 
Conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi plant itself remained very dangerous.
 
Radiation levels Thursday hit 20 millisieverts per hour at an annex building where workers have been trying to re-establish electrical power, "the highest registered (at that building) so far," a Tokyo Electric official told reporters.

By comparison, the typical resident of a developed country is naturally exposed to 3 millisieverts per year.
 
The company said Friday afternoon, though, that radiation levels at the plant's west gate, at .26 to .27 millisieverts, have been fairly stable over a recent 12-hour span
 
In part of the effort to prevent greater radiation emissions, Edano has said addressing issues at the nuclear facility's No. 3 reactor -- the sole damaged unit that contains plutonium along with the uranium in its fuel rods -- remains the top priority.
 
Authorities are assessing whether to also spray in and around the plant's No. 1 unit, where seawater is being injected even after a March 12 hydrogen explosion, Edano said.
 
But, he said, the situation there was not as serious as in the No. 3 reactor.
 
Units 1, 2 and 3 are "relatively stable," despite the fact their "cores have suffered damage," said Andrew.
 
He said the No. 4 reactor is a "major safety concern," with the agency noting that no water-temperature data have been collected since Monday from its spent fuel pool.
 
Still, a Tokyo Electric spokesman said Friday that video of that reactor's used-fuel storage pool appeared to show it still contained water -- rebutting a claim Wednesday by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Gregory Jaczko that it had run dry.
 
On Friday morning, Edano said temperatures in and around the Nos. 5 and 6 reactors have risen, though not enough to pose immediate danger, according to a report by Japan's Kyodo News agency.
 
Water is being injected in and an emergency diesel generator has been connected to those two units to cool their spent fuel pools, a spokesman for Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said.
 
A Tokyo Electric official said an external power source, using what amounts to 1.5 kilometers of cable, should be set up Friday to power cooling systems for the Nos. 1 and 2 reactors.
 
Still, the official admitted this effort -- which had been scheduled to be completed Thursday -- "has so far not progressed as fast as we had hoped." Late Friday afternoon, Edano said that process was still ongoing.
 
This has been a common theme the past week, as plans to resolve various crises floundering even as new issues emerge daily. The lack of an apparent major setback Thursday hardly means that more problems might not arise, with one expert saying that the efforts to cool the spent fuel pools alone will be a long, dangerous process.
 
"It's a 15-round fight, we're probably in round three," said Arnold Gundersen, a nuclear safety advocate with 39 years of nuclear engineering experience.
 
"With this nuclear fire, if you will, when (you) pour water on it one day, you have to go back and do it the same the next and the same the next ... It's a real long slog."

CNN's Brian Walker, Stan Grant and Steven Jiang contributed to this report.

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2011, 08:13:28 PM »
Montanabarb this story does include info about the nuclear contamination issue... will look for a more complete story for those who feel our media is covering it up...  Is it incomplete... not enough? - Yowbarb

Japan live blog: Death toll tops 10,000

http://news.blogs.cnn.com/category/world/japan/2011-tsunami/


March 24th, 2011   10:50 PM ET

A magnitude 9.0 earthquake hit northern Japan on March 11, triggering tsunamis that caused widespread devastation and crippled a nuclear power plant. Are you in an affected area? Send an iReport. Read the full report on the quake's aftermath and check out our interactive explainer on Japan's damaged nuclear reactors.
 
[10:49 p.m. ET Thursday, 11:49 a.m. Friday in Tokyo] The death toll from this month's earthquake and subsequent tsunami has now topped 10,000 people, Japan's National Police Agency said.
 
The agency said that 10,035 people have been confirmed dead as a result of the March 11 disaster, as of 11 a.m. Friday. Some 17,443 are still considered missing.
 
[9:56 p.m. ET Thursday, 10:56 a.m. Friday in Tokyo] The water that three men were recently exposed to while working at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant had 10,000 times the amount of typical radiation for that location, an official with Japan's nuclear and industrial safety agency said Friday.
 
The high reading indicates that the fuel inside the No. 3 reactor "is damaged," Hidehiko Nitsayama said. At least two of the workers were hospitalized after stepping in the water Thursday while laying cable in the turbine building of the No. 3 reactor.
 
Nitsayama explained that the water in this place is typically boiled and has very low levels of radiation. He said that government officials have contacted authorities with the Tokyo Electric Power Company, which manages the plant, to urge the company to "improve its radiation management measures."
 
[9:51 p.m. ET Thursday, 10:51 a.m. Friday in Tokyo] Japan's health ministry says radiation above the legal limit has been detected in a vegetable grown in Tokyo, NHK reports. Radioactive cesium was found Thursday in a leafy vegetable taken from a field in Edogawa ward. The vegetable, called Komatsuna, or Japanese mustard spinach, contained 890 becquerels per kilogram, exceeding the legal limit of 500. This is the first time that radioactive cesium exceeding the legal limit has been found in a Tokyo vegetable.
 
[8:20 p.m. ET Thursday, 9:20 a.m. Friday in Tokyo] Nissan Motor Co. said it is considering shipping engines made in the United States to Japan to replace lost production at its quake-hit plant in Fukushima Prefecture, Kyodo News reports. Production at the Iwaki engine plant has been suspended due to the effects of the March 11 earthquake. The automaker said it is looking into whether its engine plant in Tennessee can supply V-6 engines to Japan.
 
[8:04 p.m. ET Thursday, 9:04 a.m. Friday in Tokyo] Tohoku Electric Power Co., which covers areas hit by the March 11 earthquake and tsunamis, says it will forgo rolling blackouts through April 3 after being able to secure enough electricity partly through conservation efforts, Kyodo News reports. Tokyo Electric Power Co. started its own blackouts in some service areas, including Tokyo, from March 14. The unprecedented measure will continue at least through April.

[3:44 p.m. ET Thursday, 4:44 a.m. Friday in Tokyo] The outlook is generally good for two workers at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, who were hospitalized after they stepped in contaminated water, experts said Thursday, provided they were promptly decontaminated.
 
Three workers were laying cables Wednesday in the basement of the turbine building for reactor No. 3 when they stepped into the water, Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano told reporters. It seeped into the ankle-height boots of two of the men, according to Tokyo Electric Power Company, which operates the plant. Those two men, one in his 30s and a second in his 20s, were taken to Fukushima Medical University Hospital, officials said. The third was not hospitalized, because his boots were higher and covered his skin, avoiding contact, according to Tokyo Electric.
 
FULL POST  http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/03/24/japan-quake-live-blog-major-expressway-between-tokyo-and-northeast-reopens/

Post by: CNN's Brad Lendon, CNN's Eliott C. McLaughlin, The CNN Wire
...
Airborne radiation fears hit shoppers in the United States
http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/03/24/airborne-radiation-fears-hit-shoppers-in-the-united-states/
« Last Edit: March 25, 2011, 07:34:29 AM by Yowbarb »

VillageIdiot

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2011, 06:29:26 AM »
[10:49 p.m. ET Thursday, 11:49 a.m. Friday in Tokyo] The death toll from this month's earthquake and subsequent tsunami has now topped 10,000 people, Japan's National Police Agency said.
 
The agency said that 10,035 people have been confirmed dead as a result of the March 11 disaster, as of 11 a.m. Friday. Some 17,443 are still considered missing.

How very sad. I had not heard about the 17,443 people still considered missing.

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2011, 06:35:31 AM »
[10:49 p.m. ET Thursday, 11:49 a.m. Friday in Tokyo] The death toll from this month's earthquake and subsequent tsunami has now topped 10,000 people, Japan's National Police Agency said.
 
The agency said that 10,035 people have been confirmed dead as a result of the March 11 disaster, as of 11 a.m. Friday. Some 17,443 are still considered missing.

How very sad. I had not heard about the 17,443 people still considered missing.

I doubt that many of those missing will turn up...
That is sad. I'm sure in their own media and lines of communication they are doing what they can...

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2011, 07:58:15 AM »
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/as_japan_earthquake

Breach in reactor suspected at Japanese nuke plant

PHOTO: Members of Japan Ground Self Defense Force unit place a coffin at a temporary mass grave site in Higashi-Matsushima, in Miyagi Prefecture, northern Japan

By SHINO YUASA and JAY ALABASTER, Associated Press – 36 mins ago

TOKYO – A suspected breach in the reactor at the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant could mean more serious radioactive contamination, Japanese officials revealed Friday, as the prime minister called the country's ongoing fight to stabilize the plant "very grave and serious."

A somber Prime Minister Naoto Kan sounded a pessimistic note at a briefing hours after nuclear safety officials announced what could be a major setback in the urgent mission to stop the plant from leaking radiation, two weeks after a devastating earthquake and tsunami disabled it.

"The situation today at the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant is still very grave and serious. We must remain vigilant," Kan said. "We are not in a position where we can be optimistic. We must treat every development with the utmost care."

The uncertain situation halted work at the nuclear complex, where dozens had been trying feverishly to stop the overheated plant from leaking dangerous radiation. The plant has leaked some low levels of radiation, but a breach could mean a much larger release of contaminants.

The possible breach in Unit 3 might be a crack or a hole in the stainless steel chamber of the reactor core or in the spent fuel pool that's lined with several feet of reinforced concrete. The temperature and pressure inside the core, which holds the fuel rods, remained stable and was far lower than would further melt the core.

Suspicions of a possible breach were raised when two workers waded into water 10,000 times more radioactive than levels normally found in water in or around a reactor and suffered skin burns, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said.

Kan apologized to farmers and business owners for the toll the radiation has had on their livelihoods: Several countries have halted some food imports from areas near the plant after milk and produce were found to contain elevated levels of radiation.

He also thanked utility workers, firefighters and military personnel for "risking their lives" to cool the overheated facility.

The alarm Friday comes two weeks to the day since the magnitude-9 quake triggered a tsunami that enveloped cities along the northeastern coast and knocked out the Fukushima reactor's cooling systems.

Police said the official death toll jumped past 10,000 on Friday. With the cleanup and recovery operations continuing and more than 17,400 listed as missing, the final number of dead was expected to surpass 18,000.



http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/as_japan_earthquake

ASEEKERTOO

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2011, 11:08:49 AM »
The radiation monitoring channels have commercials in them every now and then. I hate that.
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/live-radiation-monitor---boulder-city-nv-las-vegas
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/live-radiation-monitoring-from-west-la
Here is a new webpage for the English version of Japanese TV. http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #11 on: March 28, 2011, 07:36:44 AM »
The radiation monitoring channels have commercials in them every now and then. I hate that.
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/live-radiation-monitor---boulder-city-nv-las-vegas
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/live-radiation-monitoring-from-west-la
Here is a new webpage for the English version of Japanese TV. http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/

ASEEKERTOO,
thanks for the info.
Meanwhile a disturbing update... I posted this in a couple other places on the Board.
- Yowbarb
...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/27/radiation-rain-water-massachusetts-radioactive_n_841188.html 

UPDATE:   Radiation In Massachusetts Rainwater Likely From Japan

-- Health officials said Sunday that one sample of Massachusetts rainwater has registered very low concentrations of radiation, most likely from the Japanese nuclear power plant damaged earlier this month by an earthquake and tsunami.

John Auerbach, the Massachusetts commissioner of public health, said that radioiodine-131 found in the sample – one of more than 100 that have been taken around the country – has a short life of only eight days. He said the drinking water supply in the state was unaffected and officials do not expect any health concerns.

Nevada and other Western states also have reported minuscule amounts of radiation, but scientists say those presented no health risks.

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health said the in-state sample was taken in the past week, but they did not say where. The testing is part of a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency network that monitors for radioactivity.

State officials said similar testing was done in California, Pennsylvania, Washington and other states, and showed comparable levels of I-131 in rain.

Massachusetts testing last week of samples from the Quabbin and Wachusett reservoirs showed no detectable levels of I-131, health officials said.

Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Richard K. Sullivan Jr. directed the Department of Environmental Protection to collect additional samples for testing from several water bodies across Massachusetts. Results will be available over the next several days.

In Japan, mounting problems, including miscalculated radiation figures and inadequate storage tanks for huge amounts of contaminated water, stymied emergency workers Sunday as they struggled to bring the country's nuclear complex back from the edge of disaster. Workers were trying to remove radioactive water from the nuclear compound and restart the regular cooling systems for the dangerously hot fuel.

ASEEKERTOO

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2011, 07:50:44 AM »
Wow, they found some all the way into Massachusetts. Undoubtedly, more to come.
The whole situation is pretty bad and we can only hope things don't get even worse. Once plutonium escapes in sufficient
quantities then 'game almost over'

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2011, 08:09:05 AM »
Wow, they found some all the way into Massachusetts. Undoubtedly, more to come.
The whole situation is pretty bad and we can only hope things don't get even worse. Once plutonium escapes in sufficient
quantities then 'game almost over'

Thanks... we can only keep a good thought and take the things which could help...

Yowbarb

  • Guest
Re: Media coverage of the nuclear reactor leak
« Reply #14 on: March 31, 2011, 12:29:37 PM »
Daily Mail:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1371793/Japan-nuclear-crisis-Fukushima-plant-entombed-concrete-radiation-leak.html
Bodies of 1,000 victims of Japan earthquake left uncollected because of fears of high levels of radiation
By Richard Shears
Last updated at 5:50 PM on 31st March 2011


•   Police, rescue workers and family members could be exposed to radiation
•   Radioactivity levels in the ocean 4,385 times above regulatory limit
•   Fisherman warned not to operate within 12 miles of plant
•   Compensation claims could top $12bn
•   Power firm's shares lose 80% of value - may need government bailout
•   President still recovering in hospital recovering from 'fatigue and stress'
•   U.S. sends specialist Marine unit to assist in decontamination
•   Traces of radioactive particles found in U.S. milk
Up to 1,000 bodies of victims of the Japan earthquake and tsunami have not been collected because of fears of high levels of radiation.
Police sources said bodies within the 12-mile evacuation zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant had been 'exposed to high levels of radiation after death'.
It follows the discovery of a body on Sunday in Okuma, just three miles from the power plant, which revealed elevated levels of radiation.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1371793/Japan-nuclear-crisis-Fukushima-plant-entombed-concrete-radiation-leak.html#ixzz1ICsKAoam
Fears have now been raised that police officers, doctors and bereaved family members may be exposed to radiation as they go to retrieve the bodies.
Japan Today said authorities initially planned to inspect the bodies after transporting them outside the evacuation zone, but that is now being reconsidered


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1371793/Japan-nuclear-crisis-Fukushima-plant-entombed-concrete-radiation-leak.html#ixzz1ICrsud1M

[IMAGE] Too dangerous: This aerial photograph of the Fukushima plant shows the damaged reactors three and four at the which will now be entombed in concrete after the battle to contain radiation was lost

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1371793/Japan-nuclear-crisis-Fukushima-plant-entombed-concrete-radiation-leak.html#ixzz1ICs67qbS

 

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